Reasons Why a Gas Stove Keeps Clicking and Sparking

gas stove burner flame

A gas burner that continually clicks or sparks not only annoying, it could be a sign that the gas range is headed towards a breakdown.  Here are some things to try to stop the clicking noise, along with some parts to check that might be causing the problem.

WARNING: Before attempting to work on any appliance, make sure that all power (electricity) and utilities (water and gas) have been turned off and/or disconnected on the appliance. Read more

Make Sure the Knobs and Burner Area is Dry

Gas range stove top burner with ignitor exposed

Wet sponges from cleaning and over flowing pots can dampen the ignitor on the range. Unplug the stove and remove the burner grate, cap and head. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol in order to clean the spark electrode ignitor and to dissolve any liquid on the part. Let it dry completely before attempting to use the burner again.

Liquid from cleaning and from cooking can get into the stove and be the cause behind the burners continuously making a clicking sound. Make sure the area around the stove knobs, which houses the spark ignition switches and the area around the burner, next to the spark electrode ignitor are completely dry before attempting to use the stove top burners again.

 

If a pot over flowed or spilled on the burner, turn the gas burner off and let the area cool down. Remove the grate, burner cap and burner head to access the spark electrode ignitor. The spark electrode ignitor provides the spark that lights the burner flame and sits near the burner head.

 

Gas range panel with burner control knob removed.

 

Like the spark electrode ignitor, water can also get into the switches, either from cleaning by the stove knobs, or from overflowing boiling pots on the stove top. Turn off power to the stove and allow the switches to dry out to see if that solves the problem.

Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol in order to clean the spark electrode ignitor and to dissolve any liquid on the part. Continue reading

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Why won’t my washing machine spin? Washer repair help

If your washing machine is no longer spinning, it might be due to a faulty  motor coupler, faulty clutch  (top load washers) or water level switch.

Washer Clutch assembly part

Clutch Kit commonly used on Direct Drive model Whirlpool/Kenmore brands clothes washers.
Part number: 285785

Before taking apart your washer, unplug the machine and turn off the water to the supply lines and disconnect them from your washer. Also, carefully remove the drain hose as water could still be in the hose and it might spill on to your floor.

If your washer makes a noise when you manually advance the timer to a spin cycle, but it is not actually spinning, then it could be a problem with the motor transmission or motor coupler.

The washing machine motor coupler is a small, relatively inexpensive washing machine part that is mounted to the shaft of the motor on one side, and to the transmission on the other. This protects your transmission from excessive loading. It can wear out over time, crack or split. Inspect the part to see if it is worn or broken and replace it.

Top-loading washing machines typically use a clutch system which connects between the transmission and the inner tub to move the tub and cause it to spin. Overtime, this part can wear out. If you notice that your clothes are wetter than normally coming out of the washer, it might be due to this part weakening and wearing out. Replace this part.

The water level switch controls how much water enters the tub according to load size. If it is not resetting once the water has drained, power will not be available to operate the motor during spin. The part will need to be replaced.

To find the right part for your washing machine, locate it’s model number and use that when searching or ordering your part from www.pcappliancerepair.com. For more washer repair help, visit the Washer Repair Help Section.